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20110301
20110331
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: japan raced to prevent a radiation catastrophe today as explosions rocked two reactors at a nuclear plant, and government officials urged 140,000 people near the facility to remain inside. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the rescue efforts in towns along the coast, even as the nation was hit by another powerful aftershock. and the official death toll topped 3,000, with many more homeless. >> brown: we assess the magnitude of the crisis and what's being done to avert a full nuclear meltdown. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines the economic impact of the disaster, as stock markets plunge in japan and around the world. >> brown: plus, paul solman tells the tale of two ohio counties-- once very similar economically, now far apart. >> you could go to a lot of placess around the country and they're living in one high- income reality and a couple counties away it's a whole different world. >> brown: that's all ahead. on tonight's newshour. major fundi
of the catastrophe unleashed by friday's earthquake and tsunami in japan. officials estimate the death toll could exceed 10,000, as the nation struggles with a mounting economic, nuclear, and humanitarian crisis. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have on the ground reports from several towns on japan's northeastern coast, where the search for survivors continues. >> ifill: we update the international rescue effort aimed at getting food, shelter, and medical help to victims. >> suarez: and we talk to newshour science correspondent miles o'brien and radiation expert david brenner about the state of japan's nuclear reactors. >> ifill: plus, margaret warner examines saudi arabia's military move into neighboring bahrain after a weekend of protests. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: breathe in. breathe out. as volatile as the markets have been lately, having the security of a strong financial partner certainly lets you breathe easier. for more than 140 years, pacific life has
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: a massive earthquake struck japan today, the largest in the nation's history. it triggered tsunami waves that killed at least 1,000 people. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:
in the area around japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant today, forcing emergency workers to temporarily abandon the facility, as tens of thousands of homeless struggled with snows and bitter cold. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on efforts to control the growing crisis in japan, including the stories of survivors and rescue crews in towns virtually wiped out by the tsunami. >> woodruff: we examine the health risks from the radiation spewing from the reactors and being carried by the wind far from japan's shores. >> ifill: plus, kwame holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grad
that at least one of the reactors at japan's fukushima power plant is leaking. officials have found plutonium around the plant, and highly radioactive water has been discovered for the first time outside the building. the tokyo electric power company, tepco, maintains it poses no health risk to humans. we have this report. >> plutonium habeen found in five spots around fukushima, but tepco insists the levels are not harmful. >> the level detective is extremely small and will not affect human health. -- the level detected. >> they were trying to stay on top of the situation. now, a government reesentative is says that there may have been a partial meltdown inside reactor number two, this after water rose to more than 100,000 times its normal level over the weekend. they now have to pump out the contaminated water before they continue to work on reestablishing the cooling system. engineers can only spend a few minutes at a time in the reactor buildings due to the radiation levels. >> when you are inside, you are coaminated by radiation. i was exposed over five days. the longer you spend inside,
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: workers at japan's damaged fukushima nuclear plant used water cannons, heavy duty fire hoses, and military helicopters in an effort to cool down overheating fuel rods, but it's not clear that anything has worked. president obama said today there was no risk to any u.s. territory from the reactors. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on the containment operations, the ongoing exodus of people from areas close to the reactors, and new footage from when the tsunami struck six days ago. >> woodruff: and amid signs of both resilience and confusion, we look at japan's political culture in response to the disaster. >> brown: then, ray suarez has an update on libya, as the u.n. moves to a vote on establishing a no-fly zone over the country. >> woodruff: margaret warner talks to irish prime minister enda kenny about the celtic tiger's struggle to kick-start it's economy. >> brown: and tom bearden reports on a project to use private satellites to help stop g
containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf
within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> a
. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and fou
representative mike pence. >> woodruff: spencer michels looks at the science behind tsunamis and whether japan's crisis is a wake-up call for the united states. >> government scientists here in seattle say their tsunami warning systems saved a lot of lives but they're not sure what would happen if the big one hits the pacific northwest. >> brown: and margaret warner updates the political chaos and escalating violence in the african nation of ivory coast. that all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find it in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more went into bringing energy to the world. >> the economy is tough right now, everywhere. >> we pumped $21 million into local economies, into small businesses, communities, equipment, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. d
crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers; launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's fute. >> it's my country's future. >> you can't manufacture pride, but p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)